Current Whereabouts of Indianapolis 500 Winning Cars

1911: Marmon "Wasp" (Ray Harroun)
The winning car of the first Indianapolis 500 is restored to running condition. It is owned and and well-maintained by the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Foundation, and housed at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. On many occassions, the Marmon "Wasp" is driven around the Speedway on ceremonial laps. In July of 2001, the car was displayed at the Goodwood Festival of Speed at Lord March’s Goodwood estate in southern England. During the year, it is on permanent display promenantly at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. On March 12-14, 2004 the "Wasp" was displayed at the Concours d' Elegance at Amelia Island, FL. On October 12, 2010, the car was included in the special Centennial Era photo shoot on the mainstrech at the Speedway, where 33 of the greatest Indy 500-winning cars were aligned in a starting grid. In the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. In April of 2011, the car was featured on a U.S. Post Office first-class postage stamp. On race morning of 2011, celebrating the 100th Anniversary of the Indy 500, former winner Parnelli Jones drove the car around the track for a couple ceremonial laps. Initially the car stalled in turn 1 with a leak, but eventually Jones pulled away and completed the lap. In June 2011, the car participated in the Goodwood Festival of Speed.

1912: National (Joe Dawson)
Owned and restored to running condition by the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Foundation, and housed at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. On May 8, 2002, Bill Spoerle, head of restoration at the Speedway, drove the car around the track for a few ceremonial laps. On October 12, 2010, the car was included in the special Centennial Era photo shoot on the mainstrech at the Speedway, where 33 of the best Indy 500-winning cars were aligned in a starting grid. In the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. On race morning of 2011, celebrating the 100th Anniversary of the Indy 500, former winner Bobby Unser drove the car around the track for a couple ceremonial laps. His wife Lisa rode along with him in the riding mechanic's seat.

1913: Peugeot (Jules Goux)
Current whereabouts unconfirmed. Car was actually a 1912 model Peugeot, built for use in Grand Prix racing. In 1914, Peugeot disbanded is racing operations due to W.W.I., and some of the cars were bought by individuals, raced without factory backing. This car was assumed to be bought, but it is unknown by whom.

1914: Delage (Rene Thomas)
Owned and restored to display condition by the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Foundation, and housed at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. Car is on periodic display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. On Monday May 28, 1973, the originally scheduled race day, 88-year old Thomas returned to the Speedway and rode along in the car for a ceremonial lap. In the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum.

1915: Mercedes (Ralph DePalma)
Current whereabouts unconfirmed.

1916: Peugeot (Dario Resta)
Quite a bit of controversey surrounds this display car, which is owned by the Lindley Fowler Bothwell estate. Many historians and car collectors dispute the notion that the car is authentic, and point to several unclear linneage inconsistencies. The official account by the estate claims that this car was a 1913 model Peugeot grand prix car, bought by Resta in 1915 when the Peugeot factory team disbanded its racing operations due to W.W.I. Resta finished second at Indy in 1915 (painted as #3), and won the 1916 race (painted as #17), which was scheduled for 300 miles. Resta also went on to win the 1916 AAA championship with the car. The car passed to Art Klein, the head of transportation at Warner Brothers Studios in Los Angeles. In 1949, he sold the car to prolific automobile collector Lindley Fowler Bothwell. In 1949, Bothwell actually entered the car (painted differently as #66) into the Indy 500 and practiced in the car, reaching a four lap timed average of 103.25 mph, earning him a driver's certificate. Bothwell hoped to qualify the car but, however, did not attempt to qualify, because due to the high speeds, the car began handled poorly. The car was on frequent display at Bothwell's citrus estate and other various shows, and recently at the Goodwood Festival of Speed. On race day 1966, the car was driven around the track for a ceremonial lap before the race, celebrating 50 years since the victory. Bothwell died in 1986, and the car remains part of his estate (painted in its #66 version), and is on occasional display at various events. On his radio program in 2007, Indianapolis Motor Speedway Historian Donald Davidson expressed some doubt about the car's authenticity. However, the estate claims to have extensive documentation of the car's authenticty, history, and various other data, supporting its status and restoration. In 2011, the car will be displayed at the Desert Classic Concourse d'Elegance.

1919: Peugeot (Howdy Wilcox)
Current whereabouts unconfirmed. Another Peugeot that was bought privately from the factory team when it disbanded due to W.W.I.

1920: Frontenac (Gaston Chevrolet)
This is the same car that Chevrolet was killed in at Beverly Hills in November of that same year. It was either completely destroyed in the accident or at very least, salvaged for parts shortly afterwards.

1921: Frontenac (Tommy Milton)
Current whereabouts unconfirmed.

1922: Duesenburg Murphy Special (Jimmy Murphy)
The same car that won the 1921 French Grand Prix (Le Mans) with a different engine. Owned and restored to running condition by the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Foundation, and housed at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. On May 10, 2001, legendary car builder A.J. Watson drove the car at the Speedway for two ceremonial laps. Car is on periodic display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. It is not painted in its Indy 500 winning condition, instead it was restored to its Grand Prix ensignia. On October 12, 2010, the car was included in the special Centennial Era photo shoot on the mainstrech at the Speedway, where 33 of the best Indy 500-winning cars were aligned in a starting grid. In the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum.

1923: Miller (Tommy Milton)
Current whereabouts unknown. However in the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum.

1924: Duesenberg (L.L. Corum & Joe Boyer)
Current whereabouts unknown.

1925 & 1927: Duesenberg (Peter DePaolo in '25, George Souders in '27)
There is some dispute as to the veracity of the car being a two-time winner. The official account, as proported by the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum is that this car represents the Indy 500 winning car of 1925 and 1927, by different drivers (Peter DePaolo and George Souders, respectively), consistent with the car having been sold in the time between the races. However, other records, photographs, and accounts, suggest otherwise. Prior to his death, Souders continued to claim the car was the same that DePaolo drove. Speedway historian Donald Davidson has not made any official declarations of authenticty, or lack thereof, however, he appears unwilling to confirm. The car has been restored to the 1925 running condition by the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. The only original parts are believed to be the engine block, and few other pieces. On race day in 1975, DePaolo drove the car for a few ceremonial laps, celebrating 50 years since the victories. The car is part of a private collection, and has participated in numerous vintage car events. If the 1927 winning car is indeed a seperate machine, its location and restoration status is completely unknown.

1926: Miller (Frank Lockhart)
Current whereabouts unknown.

1928: Miller (Louis Meyer)
Owned and restored to display condition by the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Foundation, and housed at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. There are slight discrepancies from the original paint sceme with the color of the numbers. It is also reportedly not made of original parts, instead it is made from a collection of genuine Miller-era parts. The front axle, for example is from a 122 C.I.D model, instead of the 91 C.I.D. It is on periodic display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. On race day 1978, Meyer drove the car for a few ceremonial laps, celebrating the 50th anniversary of his victory. On the rained out race day in 1986, Meyer drove the car for a ceremonial lap, celebrating fifty years since becoming the first three-time winner. On October 12, 2010, the car was included in the special Centennial Era photo shoot on the mainstrech at the Speedway, where 33 of the best Indy 500-winning cars were aligned in a starting grid. In the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. On race morning of 2011, celebrating the 100th Anniversary of the Indy 500, former winner Bobby Rahal was scheduled to drive the car around the track for a couple ceremonial laps.

1929: Simplex PistonRing Miller (Ray Keech)
Owner and restorer unconfirmed. On March 12-14, 2004 the car, or a replica, was displayed at the Concours d' Elegance at Amelia Island, FL. Permanent whereabouts are unconfirmed.

1930: Miller-Hartz (Billy Arnold)
Current whereabouts unconfirmed.

1931: Bowes Seal Fast Miller (Louis Schnieder)
Cars is owned by a private collector, Margery Uihlein, and restored to at least a display condition. The car participated in the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame vintage car show and parade laps on "500" Festival Community Day, May 21-22, 2003. On March 12-14, 2004 the car was displayed at the Concours d' Elegance at Amelia Island, Florida. In the spring of 2011 the car was scheduled to appear in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum.

1932: Miller-Hartz (Fred Frame)
Owned and restored to running condition by the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Foundation, and housed at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. For several years the car was in the posession of longtime Hulman & Co. employee Frank Roales of Vincennes, Indiana. The car is believed to be the same car that Peter Kreis and his riding mechanic Bob Hahn were killed in during practice on May 25, 1934. Bill Spoerle, head of restoration at the Speedway, once drove the car around the track for ceremonial laps. It is on periodic display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. On October 12, 2010, the car was included in the special Centennial Era photo shoot on the mainstrech at the Speedway, where 33 of the best Indy 500-winning cars were aligned in a starting grid. In the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum.

1933: Tydol Miller (Louis Meyer)
Owned and and restored to at least a display condition by a private collector. The car was present at the first Miller Race Car Reunion at the Milwaukee Mile in July of 1994. In the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum.

1934: Boyle Miller (Bill Cummings)
Car is part of the W.A. Goodwin Collection in Frankfort, Indiana, owned by William and Sonya Miller. It currently contains a prewar 255cid Offy. The Goodwin Collection is housed in the rear of the Goodwin Funeral Home, and is open for visiting daily, except when a funeral is in progress. There has been some mild dispute about the authenticity of the car. The collection includes a number of other important cars. In the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum.

1935: Gilmore Speedway Special (Kelly Petillo)
According to Indianapolis Motor Speedway historian Donald Davidson, the car no longer exists.

1936: Ring Free Miller (Louis Meyer)
The car that was driven by the first three-time winner is believed to still exist. It is believed to have recently been purchased by a private collector. Status and specific whereabouts unconfirmed.

1937: Shaw-Gilmore Special (Wilbur Shaw)
According to Indianapolis Motor Speedway historian Donald Davidson, the car no longer exists. Same car that Shaw drove in the race in 1936. Car was also driven by Mauri Rose in 1939, Billy DeVore in 1940, and Frank Wearne in 1941 & 1946. The car may have also been driven by Paul Russo in 1947, and by Joie Chitwood in 1948. In the fall of 1946, George Barringer was driving the car at Atlanta, and was involved in a crash that took his life, and that of the 1946 "500" winner George Robson. In 1949, George Metzler also suffered fatal injuries driving the car, crashing it in practice.

1938: Burd Piston Ring (Floyd Roberts)
According to Indianapolis Motor Speedway historian Donald Davidson, the car no longer exists. Car is known to be the same car that Roberts was killed in during a crash in the 1939 race. The car did not suffer irreparable damage, and was rebuilt. In 1940, the car was raced in the 500 by Cliff Bergere. Reports indicate that after W.W.I.I., George Robson also drove the car at Atlanta in 1946, were he too crashed and was fatally injured. Sometime after that crash, the car was salvaged.

1939-1940: Boyle Special Maserati (Wilbur Shaw '39 & '40)
This back-to-back winner is owned and restored to running condition by the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Foundation, and housed at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. It is painted up as the 1940 version, with a number "1," rather than the number "2" used in 1939. The car was wrecked by Shaw in the 1941 race, then it was raced again after WWII by Ted Horn (finishes of 3rd-3rd-4th from 1946-1948). Lee Wallard drove the car in 1949, and led laps. In 1950, Bill Vukovich used the car for his rookie test. On May 9, 2002, Bill Shaw, son of the late Wilbur Shaw, took the car for a ceremonial lap around the Speedway. It has been on periodic display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. On May 6, 2003, Peter Shaw, grandson of Wilbur Shaw, drove the car for a few ceremonial laps during the Speedway's back-to-back winners celebration. On May 21-22, 2003, the car was featured in the Speedway museum's vintage car show and parade laps for "500" Festival Community Day. On March 12-14, 2004 it was to be displayed at the Concours d' Elegance at Amelia Island, FL. During the month of May 2010, the Speedway was celebrating previous races from years ending in "0." The car was displayed on race morning along with the winning cars from 1960, 1980, and 2000. On October 12, 2010, the car was included in the special Centennial Era photo shoot on the mainstrech at the Speedway, where 33 of the best Indy 500-winning cars were aligned in a starting grid. In the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. On race morning of 2011, celebrating the 100th Anniversary of the Indy 500, former winner Mario Andretti drove the car around the track for a couple ceremonial laps.

1941: Noc-Out Hose Clamp Special (Floyd Davis & Mauri Rose)
Owned and restored to display condition by the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Foundation, and housed at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. A plaque indicates it was donated by Mr. & Mrs. O.A. Corriher. It is reportedly the same car that Frank Wearne drove at Indy in 1939, and that Rose drove in 1940. After the war, the car was reportedly driven by Joie Chitwood in 1946-1947, Duane Carter in 1948, and by Troy Ruttman in 1949. In 1950, Bob Sweikert practiced in the car, but was unable to qualify. Ted Horn also reportedly drove the car. In 1952, Buck Baker acquired the car, replaced the Offenhauser engine with a Cadillac V-8, and entered it in the short-lived NASCAR Speedway Division, an open-wheel series that ran from 1952-1953. Baker drove it to the lone championship in 1952, because the series disbanded after only two races in 1953. After that point, it was prepped for use as a sprint car. It was garaged in Spartanburg, North Carolina, where it was intact, but in desperate need of significant repair. Sometime in the 1970s, it was relocated to the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum, where it was restored. By 1980, it the restoration was complete. In April of 2003, it was brought to the Indycar event in Motegi, Japan for display. It is on periodic display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. In the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum.

1946: Thorne Engineering, Adams/Sparks (George Robson)
The winner of the first race presided over by the Hulman family is owned and restored to running condition by the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Foundation, and housed at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. A plaque indicates it was donated by Ray T. Brady. The car was one of two such cars built by Clyde Adams for Art Sparks in 1938. This particular car was raced at Indy from 1946-1949, and possibly prior to WWII, as Jimmy Snider finished second in 1939 driving one of the two machines. On race day 1976, Freddie Agabashian drove the car around the track for a few ceremonial laps, celebrating 30 years since the victory. In 1985 celebrating the 40th year of Hulman ownership, Tony George, currently the president of the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, drove the car for a few ceremonial laps before the race. The car is on periodic display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. On October 12, 2010, the car was included in the special Centennial Era photo shoot on the mainstrech at the Speedway, where 33 of the best Indy 500-winning cars were aligned in a starting grid. In the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum.

1947-1948: Blue Crown Spark Plug Special, Diedt/Offy (Mauri Rose)
This back-to-back winner is owned and restored to running condition by the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Foundation, and housed at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. There are reportedly a few slight deviations from the original paint scheme. A plaque indicates it was donated by Earl Slick. It continued to be race at Indy in 1950, and perhaps 1951 (1950-1951 car identification unconfirmed). On May 15, 2002, Johnny Rutherford drove the car for two ceremonial laps at the Speedway. In May of 2003, the car was supposed to be driven by Mauri Rose, Jr. for a ceremonial lap, in celebration of the back-to-back winners. However, a day before, mechanical trouble forced Rose, Jr. to drive the 1951 winner instead. On May 21-22, 2003, the car was featured in the Speedway museum's vintage car show and parade laps for "500" Festival Community Day. The car is on periodic display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. On October 12, 2010, the car was included in the special Centennial Era photo shoot on the mainstrech at the Speedway, where 33 of the best Indy 500-winning cars were aligned in a starting grid. In the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. On race morning of 2011, celebrating the 100th Anniversary of the Indy 500, former winner Tom Sneva drove the car around the track for a couple ceremonial laps.

1949: Blue Crown Spark Plug Special, Diedt/Offy (Bill Holland)
Car is part of a private collection owned by Robert J. "Buck" Boudeman. Holland drove this car from 1947-1950, with finishes of 2nd-2nd-1st-2nd. The car may have also raced at Indy in 1951 (driver for 1951 unconfirmed). It appeared at the 1996 Goodwood Festival of Speed, and is a running condition. It is currently said to be in a private collection in Michigan. During the 1970s and 1980s, it was on display at the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago, Illinois. In the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. In June 2011, the car participated in the Goodwood Festival of Speed.

1950: Wynn's Kurtis/Offy (Johnnie Parsons)
Owned and restored to a running condition by the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Foundation, and housed at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. A plaque indicates it was donated by Jim Marshall Robbins. The car was raced at Indy by Tommy Hinnershitz in 1948. Johnnie Parsons took over the ride during the 1948 season, and won the race at DuQuoin, Illinois in the race. Parsons went on to drive the car at Indy in 1949 (2nd place), and won the 1949 AAA National (Dirt) Championship with five wins. He raced at indy in the car again in 1950 (winner). The car was sold to Jim Robbins and driven by Mike Nazaruk in 1951, and by Parsons for a third time in 1952. It failed to qualify at Indy in 1953. The car is on periodic display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. On pole day in 1980, Parsons donned his original helmet, and drove the car for a few ceremonial laps around the Speedway. On October 12, 2010, the car was included in the special Centennial Era photo shoot on the mainstrech at the Speedway, where 33 of the best Indy 500-winning cars were aligned in a starting grid. In the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum.

1951: Belanger Special Kurtis/Offy (Lee Wallard)
Owned and restored to running condition by the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Foundation, and housed at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. On May 7, 2003, Mauri Rose, Jr. drove the car for a few ceremonial laps around the Speedway. The car is on periodic display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. On October 12, 2010, the car was included in the special Centennial Era photo shoot on the mainstrech at the Speedway, where 33 of the best Indy 500-winning cars were aligned in a starting grid. In the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum.

1952: Agajanian Kuzma/Offy (Troy Ruttman)
The car was first driven at Indy in 1951 by Walt Faulkner, who was the fastest qualified. Ruttman then won at Indy in 1952. Ruttman drove the same car again at Indy in 1953, and Chuck Stevenson drove it at Indy in 1954. The car is known to have won several other races, mostly on dirt. The car is on permanent display at the Petersen Automotive Museum in Los Angeles, California, owned by Bruce Meyer. On race day 1982, Ruttman drove the car for a few ceremonial laps around the Speedway, celebrating 30 years since his victory. On October 12, 2010, the car was included in the special Centennial Era photo shoot on the mainstrech at the Speedway, where 33 of the best Indy 500-winning cars were aligned in a starting grid. In the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum.

1953-1954: Fuel Injection KK500A/Offy (Bill Vukovich)
This back-to-back winner is owned and restored to a display condition by the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Foundation, and housed at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. It is the same car that, in 1952, Vukovich nearly won the race driving. The race was retired after the 1954 race, and of note, is not the car Vukovich drove at Indy in 1955 (injured fatally). The car is on periodic display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. It has been reported that the drive shaft was deliberately removed, in order to insure that no other people drive the car. The previous owner insisted that no one other than Vukovich should drive the car. In May of 2003, the car was prominently featured in the museum for the Speedway's back-to-back winners celebration. On October 12, 2010, the car was included in the special Centennial Era photo shoot on the mainstrech at the Speedway, where 33 of the best Indy 500-winning cars were aligned in a starting grid. In the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum.

1955: John Zink KK500D/Offy (Bob Swiekert)
Owned and restored to a display condition by the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Foundation, and housed at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. The car is on periodic display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. In the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum.

1956: John Zink Watson/Offy (Pat Flaherty)
The car was entered at Indy again in 1957, and raced again at Indy in 1958. The car was then used as a dirt champ car in 1959. The car is restored to at least display condition, and has been located at the John Zink Museum in Sand Springs, OK. The museum is open by invitation only. In March of 2006, the car was put on display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum as part of the museum's 50th anniversary celebration. The car was placed in a replica garage, re-created to look like a unit from Gasoline Alley prior to its reconstruction in 1986. Two authentic green wooden doors highlight the display. In the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum.

1957-1958: Belond Special Salih/Offy (Sam Hanks in '57, Jimmy Bryan in '58)
Owned and restored to running condition by the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Foundation, and housed at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. On May 17, 2002, Johnny Rutherford drove the car for two ceremonial laps around the Speedway. On race day 1982, Hanks drove the car for a couple ceremonial laps around the Speedway, celebrating 25 years since the victory. The car is on periodic display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. On October 12, 2010, the car was included in the special Centennial Era photo shoot on the mainstrech at the Speedway, where 33 of the best Indy 500-winning cars were aligned in a starting grid. In the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum.

1959: Leader Card Watson/Offy Roadster (Rodger Ward)
Car was sold to Doug Stearley for the 1961 race. It is the same car that Tony Bettenhausen, Sr. was killed in at the Speedway. The car was in fact, repaired after the crash, and was presented for technical inspection later the following week. The car was restored by A.J. Watson himself, and it remained in his shop for several years. He sold it to Bob Rubin from Long Island, it then passed to a dealers, and then on to the Patrick Ryan collection. It appeared at Pebble Beach, and the Goodwood Festival. Currently, the car is owned by former Indy driver Buzz Calkins and his father Bradly Caulkins. It was acquired by him for $750,000 from the Patrick Ryan collection. It is known to have several new parts, including a different, but correct, 255 motor. In the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum.

1960: Ken Paul Special (Jim Rathamnn)
The actual car is/was in the possession of Bob McConnel. The car was raced for a while after wining in 1960, and was the car in which Nolan Johncock was fatally injured. Rathmann drove it again at Indy in 1961 and 1962. The car is painted up in the Wally Wier colors, which it was when Bob Harkey drove it to 8th place in 1964. The Indianapolis Motor Speedway Foundation owns a replica of the 1960 winner, although some say it is poorly recreated. The paint scheme, and body work is reportedly inaccurate. Jim Rathmann's auto dealership reported also has a replica of the 1960 winner, built by A.J. Watson. During the month of May 2010, the Speedway was celebrating previous races from years ending in "0." The replica car was displayed on race morning along with the winning cars from 1940, 1980, and 2000. In the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum.

1961: Bowes Seal Fast Offy (A.J. Foyt)
Owned and restored to a running condition by the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Foundation, and housed at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. Foyt drove the car at Indy again in 1962 and 1963. The car is usually on promenent display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. On Pole Day, May 16, 1998, Foyt drove the car for a few fast ceremonial laps around the track at 10:42 AM. After driving quite fast for several laps, officials eventually had to lovingly force him back to the pits. On Carb Day, May 24, 2001, twelve-time 500 starter Bill Vukovich, Jr. drove the car for a few ceremonial laps at 10:30 AM. On Opening Day, May 6, 2007, all five of Foyt's winning cars (1961, 1964, 1967, 1977, 1999), and the 1977 Oldsmobile pace car, participated in ceremonial laps celebrating Foyt's fiftieth year of competition at Indy. Former Foyt driver George Snider drove the 1961 winning car around the track. In addition, for 2007, the 1961 winning car replaced the 1956 winning car in the replica classic garage inside the museum. On October 12, 2010, the car was included in the special Centennial Era photo shoot on the mainstrech at the Speedway, where 33 of the best Indy 500-winning cars were aligned in a starting grid. In the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum.

1962: Leader Card Watson/Offy Roadster (Rodger Ward)
Owned and restored to a running condition by the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Foundation, and housed at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. The car was also raced at Indy in 1963 by Don Branson. On May 16, 1999, Ward drove the car for two ceremonial laps at the Speedway. On race day 1982, Ward drove the car for a couple ceremonial laps at the Speedway, celebrating twenty years since his victory. The car is on periodic display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. On October 12, 2010, the car was included in the special Centennial Era photo shoot on the mainstrech at the Speedway, where 33 of the best Indy 500-winning cars were aligned in a starting grid. In the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum.

1963: Agajanian Watson/Offy "Old Calhoun" (Parnelli Jones)
Owned and restored to running condition by the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Foundation, and housed at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. The car was raced at Indy from 1960-1964, and was also the first car to qualify over 150 mph (1962). Lloyd Ruby drove the car new in 1960, and Jones drove it from 1961-1964, leading the race all four times. On May 10, 1998, Jones drove the car for a few ceremonial laps around the Speedway for the Parade of Champions celebration. The car is on periodic display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. On October 12, 2010, the car was included in the special Centennial Era photo shoot on the mainstrech at the Speedway, where 33 of the best Indy 500-winning cars were aligned in a starting grid. In the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum.

1964: Sheraton-Thompson Watson/Offy (A.J. Foyt)
Owned and restored to at least display condition by the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Foundation, and housed at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. The car was raced at Indy in 1963 by Ebb Rose, and was raced additionally by Foyt throughout the 1964 season. The car is on periodic display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. On Opening Day, May 6, 2007, all five of Foyt's winning cars (1961, 1964, 1967, 1977, 1999), and the 1977 Oldsmobile pace car, participated in ceremonial laps celebrating Foyt's fiftieth year of competition at Indy. Al Unser, Jr., racing for Foyt in 2007, drove the 1964 winning car around the track. On October 12, 2010, the car was included in the special Centennial Era photo shoot on the mainstrech at the Speedway, where 33 of the best Indy 500-winning cars were aligned in a starting grid. In the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum.

1965: Type 38 Lotus Powered by Ford (Jim Clark)
The car was not raced again after the victory in 1965. It was acquired by the Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, Michigan where it was on display for many years. On January 19, 2006 the car was on display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum, in conjunction with a reception announcing the 2006 500 Festival theme "Celebrate the Spectacle." Clark's car was on display along with 2005 winner Dan Wheldon's winning car, as both were from England. For the car's 45th anniversary, a major restoration project was commissioned, led by Walter Goodwin of Racecar Restorations Inc. The car was restored to perfect running condition, and took part in the Goodwood Festival of Speed in England. IndyCar driver Dario Franchitti drove the car around the Speedway in 2010, as part of a feature for the car's restoration published in Road & Track magazine. The car remains part of the Henry Ford Museum collection, and will be a featured as a "flagship" car for display and participation in events. On October 12, 2010, the car was included in the special Centennial Era photo shoot on the mainstrech at the Speedway, where 33 of the best Indy 500-winning cars were aligned in a starting grid. In the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. On race morning of 2011, celebrating the 100th Anniversary of the Indy 500, former winner Al Unser, Sr. drove the car around the track for a couple ceremonial laps. In June 2011, the car participated in the Goodwood Festival of Speed.

1966: American Red Ball Lola T-90/Ford (Graham Hill)
The car is part of the Prisma Collection of Patrick S. Ryan of Ashville, North Carolina. It is chassis #2. The car raced again in 1967 Chuck Hulse, who crashed on the last lap, the same crash A.J. Foyt squeezed through to win the race. The car was heavily damaged. Bif Caruso stored it in California, then sold it to Phil Henny, who restored it to race-winning condition. He hoped to prove it was Jackie Stewart's car, but Stewart's car was confirmed to be chassis #1, while Rodger Ward's car was confirmed as chassis #3, with the serial numbers verified by George Bignotti. The car was restored at that time without an engine. It came into the hands of Dave Uihlein, who had Paul Freehold install a Watson-built Ford Indy 4-cam, but not yet to a running condition. It then sold to Ryan, who has not had any additional work done as of yet. In the spring of 2011 the car was to be included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum, but it did not arrive. In June 2011, the car participated in the Goodwood Festival of Speed, where Hill's son Josh Hill drove the car - at Goodwood, it was indicated to be a replica.

1967: Sheraton-Thompson Coyote/Foyt (A.J. Foyt)
Owned and restored to at least display condition by the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Foundation, and housed at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. The car is on periodic display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. The 1967 STP Turbine (Parnelli Jones), which dominated the race that year, is also on periodic display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum, on loan from the Smithsonian Institute. On Opening Day, May 6, 2007, all five of Foyt's winning cars (1961, 1964, 1967, 1977, 1999), and the 1977 Oldsmobile pace car, participated in ceremonial laps celebrating Foyt's fiftieth year of competition at Indy. Larry Foyt, A.J.'s son, drove the 1967 winning car around the track. In the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum.

1968: Rislone Special Eagle (Bobby Unser)
Owned and restored to running condition by the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Foundation, and housed at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. The car was raced again at Indy in 1970 by Mike Mosely, and in 1971 by George Snider. On May 11, 1998, for it's 30th anniversary, Unser drove the car for two ceremonial laps at the Speedway. On his final lap the car stalled and required a tow back to the pits. The car is on periodic display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. On March 12-14, 2004 it was to be displayed at the Concours d' Elegance at Amelia Island, FL. On September 19, 2005, the Unser Racing Museum opened in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The car was present at the grand opening, and is currently on long-term loan and displayed there. On October 12, 2010, the car was included in the special Centennial Era photo shoot on the mainstrech at the Speedway, where 33 of the best Indy 500-winning cars were aligned in a starting grid. In the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum.

1969: STP Hawk III Ford (Mario Andretti)
Owned and restored to a display condition by the Smithsonian Institution. It is located at the National Museum of American History in Washington, DC, on the National Mall, as part of the "America on the Move" exhibition. The car is currently on loan, and displayed at the Eastern Museum of Motor Racing. An indicated replica of the car is on periodic display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. In 1970, the car was raced one last time at Indy by George Follmer, who finished 31st. Other rumors claim the actual car was totaled at Dover, but reports are unconfirmed. On October 11, 2004, a replica of the 1969 winning car took part in the annual Columbus Day Parade in New York City. Mario Andretti himself served as the parade grand marshal. On October 12, 2010, the car was included in the special Centennial Era photo shoot on the mainstrech at the Speedway, where 33 of the best Indy 500-winning cars were aligned in a starting grid. In the spring of 2011 the replica car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum.

1970: Johnny Lightning P.J. Colt/Ford (Al Unser, Sr.)
Very similar to the 1971 car, it has been restored to display condition. With a close examination, subtle differences between the 1970 & 1971 winners can be visibly noticed. It is currently owned by the Parnelli Jones/Miletich Family Trust, and its normal location is displayed next to the 1971 car at the Parnelli Jones Museum. The current paint and decal scheme is believed by fairly accurate to the race winning condition. In May 2003, the car was featured in the Speedway's back-to-back winners celebration. On May 8, 2003, it was supposed to be driven for a few ceremonial laps, but mechanical problems would not allow it to leave the pits. On May 21-22, 2003, the car was featured in the Speedway museum's vintage car show and parade laps for "500" Festival Community Day. On October 12, 2010, the car was included in the special Centennial Era photo shoot on the mainstrech at the Speedway, where 33 of the best Indy 500-winning cars were aligned in a starting grid. In the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. In June 2011, the car participated in the Goodwood Festival of Speed.

Photo Courtesy of Dick Ralstin 1971: Johnny Lightning P.J. Colt/Ford (Al Unser, Sr.)
Very similar to the 1970 car, it has been restored to display condition. With a close examination, subtle differences between the 1970 & 1971 winners can be visibly noticed. It is currently owned by the Parnelli Jones/Miletich Family Trust, and its normal location is displayed next to the 1970 car at the Parnelli Jones Museum. The current paint color and decal scheme is believed by many to be considerably inaccurate from race winning condition. The color on the car now is much lighter than it was at the time of the win. In the summer of 2002, the car was on display for the grand opening of the Indy 500 display at the Petersen Automotive Museum in Los Angeles. On September 19, 2005, the Unser Racing Museum opened in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The car was present at the grand opening, and is currently on long-term loan and displayed there. In the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum.

1972: Sunoco McLaren M16B (Mark Donohue)
Owned and restored to running condition by the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Foundation, and housed at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. A plaque indicates it was donated by Sun Oil Company. It was entered in the race again in 1978 but did not qualify. It is the only Penske winning car that the Speedway has possession of. Roger Penske, the winning owner, owns a replica of the car, which is reportedly the car that Gary Bettenhausen drove in the 1972 race, painted to match Donohue's car. This car is one of Roger Penske's Indy winning cars (or replicas) that is displayed on a rotating basis at the Penske Racing Museum in Phoenix, Arizona. The 1972 Hurst/Old Cutlass Indianapolis 500 Pace Car which was awarded to Donohue is also on display at the Penske museum. In early 2008, the car was reportedly displayed at the Penske-Wynn Ferrari-Maserati dealership at The Wynn Las Vegas. In other research, some indications suggested that the car in the museum is not authentic, and that the real winning car was sold by Penske to Salt Walther's team in 1973. It would have been the car Walther crashed in the 1973 race, and the original tub was reportedly up for sale on eBay, suggesting it was not restored. However, evidence was presented in an archived Sports Illustrated article that Jim Hurtubise was in possession of the car in the late 1970s, not Walther, and the car eventually found its way to the I.M.S. museum. On October 12, 2010, the car was included in the special Centennial Era photo shoot on the mainstrech at the Speedway, where 33 of the best Indy 500-winning cars were aligned in a starting grid. In the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. In 2016 it was again displayed at the HOF for the Team Penske 50th Anniversary exhibiton.

1973: STP Eagle/Offy (Gordon Johncock)
The actual winning car of 1973 was in the possession of Carly Brayton and the Brayton Family (relatives of the late Scott Brayton). The car was restored to at least display condition by Walter Goodwin. The Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum owns a replica of the car. The replica is not an accurate representation of the winning car. It is, in fact, a 1974-model Indy car, and the decals are equally as inaccurate. The museum replica had been on periodic display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. At some point around 2010, the authentic 1973 winner was brought to the Speedway museum for display, and the replica was moved off the museum floor to the storage basement, out of view, perhaps permanently. In the spring of 2011 the authentic car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum.

1974: McLaren M16C Offy (Johnny Rutherford)
The car was initially sold by Team McLaren to the Walther family. It was then acquired by noted collector Rick Carroll of Jensen Beach, Florida. The car was the restored. It was well-documented, and on long-term loan to the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum, but was ultimately returned to Carroll's estate, where it was auctioned off by Sotheby's in 1991. McLaren officials bid on the car, but it ultimately went to a private collector, the Prisma Collection of Patrick S. Ryan. It has appeared three times at the Concours d' Elegance at Amelia Island, FL most recently, on March 12-14, 2004. It is signed by Johnny Rutherford, and restored exactly to race-winning, running condition. In 2006, it was driven on parade laps at the Speedway during "500" Festival Community Day by Rick Hamlin. In the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. In June 2011, the car participated in the Goodwood Festival of Speed. Since then the ownership was transfered to Bill Oesterle. Purchased by Mclaren and moved to the england.

1975: Jorgensen Eagle/Offy (Bobby Unser)
The car was also raced at Indy by Pancho Carter in 1976. It is the property of the Colliers Automotive Museum in Naples, Florida. This museum is closed to the public. On March 12-14, 2004 the car, or a replica, was displayed at the Concours d' Elegance at Amelia Island, FL. In the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum.

1976: Hy-Gain McLaren Offy (Johnny Rutherford)
Was Owned and restored to a display condition at the Behring Auto Museum at Blackhawk Plaza in San Francisco, California. The car had also been run at Indy in 1975 by Lloyd Ruby, and from 1977-1979 by Cliff Hucul. Now in Korea at the Samsung Transportation Museum.

1977: Gilmore Racing Team Coyote/Foyt (A.J. Foyt)
The winning car of the first four-time Indy 500 winner currently is believed to have existed at one point amongst three chassis. The Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum owns two 1977 Foyt cars, and various loose parts, in an effort to make certain all of the actual car's components are accounted for. The Speedway museum acquired the first rolling chassis shortly after the 1977 race. In August of 1992, A.J. Foyt hosted a huge, well-publicized, auction of his personal racing inventory at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. The Speedway purchased the second chassis at that time, which is believed to contain most of the winning parts. Jim Gilmore had possession of a third chassis, but after he died in 2000, little has been reported of its current whereabouts. The museum may have acquired the car, or pieces of it, as it is uncertain if the third car was even complete. The actual rolling chassis was driven by Foyt at Indy in 1975, when he won the pole position, and again by Foyt in 1976 as well. Billy Vukovich, Jr. drove the car to a top ten finish in the 1978 race, then it was retired. The most accepted chassis, comprised of the most accepted winning parts, is on permanent display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum, and is restored to a running condition. With its status as the first four-time winner, arguably this car is considered the second-most important car in the IMS collection (second only to the 1911 winning Marmom "Wasp"). On Opening Day, May 6, 2007, all five of Foyt's winning cars (1961, 1964, 1967, 1977, 1999), and the 1977 Oldsmobile pace car, participated in ceremonial laps celebrating Foyt's fiftieth year of competition at Indy. Foyt's grandson A.J. Foyt IV drove the 1977 winning car around the track. Foyt himself rode the 1977 Oldsmobile pace car with Speedway president Tony George. On October 12, 2010, the car was included in the special Centennial Era photo shoot on the mainstrech at the Speedway, where 33 of the best Indy 500-winning cars were aligned in a starting grid. In the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. In June 2011, the car participated in the Goodwood Festival of Speed.

1978: First National City Traveler's Checks Lola/Cosworth (Al Unser, Sr.)
Owned and restored to at least display condition by the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Foundation, and housed at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. A plaque indicates it was donated by Chaparral Racing Ltd., USA. It is on periodic display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. Unser won all three 500 miles races in 1978 (the "Triple Crown" of Indianapolis, Pocono, and Ontario), although it is not clear if all three wins were accomplished in this particualr chassis. On October 12, 2010, the car was included in the special Centennial Era photo shoot on the mainstrech at the Speedway, where 33 of the best Indy 500-winning cars were aligned in a starting grid. In the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. In 2016 it was again displayed at the HOF for the Team Penske 50th Anniversary exhibiton

1979: Gould Penske PC-6/Cosworth (Rick Mears)
Research suggest that the original car was owned by a private individual, but no longer exists. In 1980 at Indy, a significant number of pieces of the car appeared on the entry of Dick Ferguson. Roger Penske, the winning owner, owns a perfect replica of the car. Mario Andretti reportedly drove the same car at Indianapolis in 1978. In 2000, Mears donned his original driving suit, and drove the replica car for a few ceremonial laps at the Speedway. This car is one of Roger Penske's Indy winning cars (or replicas) that is displayed on a rotating basis at the Penske Racing Museum in Phoenix, Arizona. On October 12, 2010, the car was included in the special Centennial Era photo shoot on the mainstrech at the Speedway, where 33 of the best Indy 500-winning cars were aligned in a starting grid. In the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum.

1980: Pennzoil Jim Hall Chapparal/Cosworth (Johnny Rutherford)
Owned and restored to running condition by the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Foundation, and housed at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. In May of 2000, Rutherford drove several ceremonial laps around the Speedway in the car on a couple occasions. It is on periodic display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. A plaque indicates it was donated by Chapparal Racing Ltd. In the fall of 2009, Rutherford drove the car around the track for a special photography session. During the month of May 2010, the Speedway was celebrating previous races from years ending in "0." Rutherford, the winner in 1980, was featured during highlights, and the car was displayed on race morning along with the winning cars from 1940, 1960, and 2000. On October 12, 2010, the car was included in the special Centennial Era photo shoot on the mainstrech at the Speedway, where 33 of the best Indy 500-winning cars were aligned in a starting grid. In the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. On race morning of 2011, celebrating the 100th Anniversary of the Indy 500, Johhny Rutherford frove the car around the track for a couple ceremonial laps. In June 2011, the car participated in the Goodwood Festival of Speed.

1981: Norton Penske PC-9B/Cosworth (Bobby Unser)
Bobby Unser himself had possession of the actual winning car for about twenty years. It is reportedly the same car that was driven by Roger Mears in the 1982 race. Unser sold the car to a private collector, Tom & Sharon Malloy (the Malloy Foundation). It has been restored to at least a display condition. In the Malloy collection, the 1st-2nd-3rd place cars from the 1981 race are displayed together as a set (Unser, Mario Andretti, and Vern Schuppan). It is officially a PC-9B chassis, yet some erroneous listings refer to it as a PC-10. Car owner Roger Penske owns a restored replica of the car, and it was recently displayed at the Petersen Automotive Museum in Los Angeles, California. This car is one of Roger Penske's Indy winning cars (or replicas) that is displayed on a rotating basis at the Penske Racing Museum in Phoenix, Arizona (as of April 2010, the car was on display there). In the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. In June 2011, the car participated in the Goodwood Festival of Speed. In 2016 it was again displayed at the HOF for the Team Penske 50th Anniversary exhibiton

1982: STP Wildcat/Cosworth (Gordon Johncock)
Owned and restored to running condition by the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Foundation, and housed at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. On May 12, 1998, Johncock drove two ceremonial laps around the Speedway in the car. During the two laps, the tires began to fail, and Johncock was forced to nurse the car back to the pits. It is on periodic display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. On October 12, 2010, the car was included in the special Centennial Era photo shoot on the mainstrech at the Speedway, where 33 of the best Indy 500-winning cars were aligned in a starting grid. In the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum.

1983: Texaco Star March/Cosworth (Tom Sneva)
Owned and restored to running condition by the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Foundation, and housed at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. A plaque indicates it was donated to the museum by Bignotti/Cotter & Texaco. On May 15, 1998, Sneva drove two ceremonial laps around the Speedway in the car. It is on periodic display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. On October 12, 2010, the car was included in the special Centennial Era photo shoot on the mainstrech at the Speedway, where 33 of the best Indy 500-winning cars were aligned in a starting grid. In the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum.

1984: Pennzoil Z-7 Penske March 84C/Cosworth (Rick Mears)
Owned and restored to running condition by the Penske Team. This car is one of Roger Penske's Indy winning cars (or replicas) that is displayed on a rotating basis at the Penske Racing Museum in Phoenix, Arizona (as of April 2010, the car was on display there). In the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. In 2016 it was again displayed at the HOF for the Team Penske 50th Anniversary exhibiton.

1985: Miller High Life Penske March 85C/Cosworth (Danny Sullivan)
Owned and restored to running condition by the Penske Team. This car is one of Roger Penske's Indy winning cars (or replicas) that is displayed on a rotating basis at the Penske Racing Museum in Phoenix, Arizona (as of April 2010, the car was not being displayed). At the 2010 Indianapolis 500, the infield midway near the Hall of Fame Museum featured the Marlboro Experience, an interactive tent for adult smokers featuring displays provided by Phillip Morris. One of the rooms in the tent was titled "Penske World," and it included many items from Team Penske. All fifteen of owner Roger Penske's Indy 500 "Baby Borg" winner's trophies were on display, as well as the 15 race-winning helmets (or replicas). Included in the display was Danny Sullivan's 1985 winning car, on loan from the Penske Museum in Arizona. Patrons were allowed to have their picture taken with the car. In the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. In June 2011, the car participated in the Goodwood Festival of Speed. In 2016 it was again displayed at the HOF for the Team Penske 50th Anniversary exhibiton.

1986: Budweiser/Truesports March/Cosworth (Bobby Rahal)
At one time around 1986-1987, this car, chassis number 13, was loaned to and displayed at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. At the end of the 1986 season, Truesports, led by Steve Horne, restored the car to winning condition, including the original race-winning motor. In 1988, it was sold by Truesports to a private collector, the Prisma Collection of Patrick S. Ryan. It has appeared twice at Amelia Island. On March 12-14, 2004 the car was displayed at the Concours d' Elegance at Amelia Island, FL. It is currently restored to racing condition, but has not been on a track since 1986. It has been on display at several vintage races. In the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. In June 2011, the car participated in the Goodwood Festival of Speed.

1987: Cummins/Holset Penske March 86C/Cosworth (Al Unser, Sr.)
Owned and restored to running condition by the Penske Team. This is the same chassis (86C-22) that Rick Mears drove to the pole position and a third-place finish in the 1986 Indianapolis 500. It also qualified on the pole position for the 1986 Michigan 500 by Mears. Danny Sullivan drove the car to victory in the 1986 Meadowlands race. On May 14, 1998, Unser drove the car for two ceremonial laps at the Speedway. This car is one of Roger Penske's Indy winning cars that is displayed on a rotating basis at the Penske Racing Museum in Phoenix, Arizona (as of April 2010, it was on display there). On Opening Day, May 5, 2008, Al Unser, Sr. drove what was reported to be a replica of the car around the track for a ceremonial lap during festivities honoring the Unser family. In the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. In 2016 it was again displayed at the HOF for the Team Penske 50th Anniversary exhibiton.

1988: Pennzoil Z-7 Penske PC-17/Chevrolet (Rick Mears)
Owned and restored to running condition by the Penske Team. This car is one of Roger Penske's Indy winning cars (or replicas) that is displayed on a rotating basis at the Penske Racing Museum in Phoenix, Arizona. In early 2008, the car was reportedly displayed at the Penske-Wynn Ferrari-Maserati dealership at the Wynn Las Vegas. During the month of May 2008, the car was on special display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. In the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. In 2016 it was again displayed at the HOF for the Team Penske 50th Anniversary exhibiton.

1989: Marlboro Penske PC-18/Chevrolet (Emerson Fittipaldi)
For the 1989 CART season, Penske Racing sold Pat Patrick Racing two brand new, model year PC-18 chassis. At the time, Penske had only sold previous year chassis to other competitors. Fittipaldi won the Indy 500, and the 1989 CART championship. At year's end, Chip Ganassi took over the assets of the team (Patrick formed a new alliance with the Alfa Romeo Indy car program). Fittipaldi left the team to join Penske Racing. Ganassi renamed the team to Chip Ganassi Racing, and kept the two PC-23 chassis. For the 1990 season, Indy car rookie Eddie Cheever became the new driver, and utilized Fittipaldi's cars from 1989. It is assumed that Cheever drove Fittipaldi's winning car in during the 1990 CART season, and in 1990 at Indy. The car's status after the 1990 season is somewhat unclear, however, as of today, the car is owned by the Penske Museum, who acquired the car at some time in the 1990s. The restoration status is unspecified, but it is to least a display condition. The car of Al Unser, Jr. (1989 Valvoline Lola/Chevrolet), who crashed out while battling Fittipaldi and finished second, has been restored and sold. In April of 2005, Unser, Jr.'s car was sold at the Barrett-Jackson auction to a private collector. The car has been accurately restored by a team led by Owen Snyder, and is in running, but not a competition, condition. The car sold along with Unser, Jr.'s uniform and other related paraphernalia. In the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. There was/is a replica of this car that was owned by Emmo himself in Brazil, along with the 1989 pace car he won. Both were SIEZED by the Brazilian goverments during the recent bankruptcy.

1990: Domino's Pizza "Hot One" Lola/Chevrolet (Arie Luyendyk)
The winner of the fastest-ever Indy 500 is owned and restored to running condition by the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Foundation, and housed at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. It is on periodic display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. On October 12, 2010, the car was included in the special Centennial Era photo shoot on the mainstrech at the Speedway, where 33 of the best Indy 500-winning cars were aligned in a starting grid. In the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. On race morning of 2011, celebrating the 100th Anniversary of the Indy 500, Arie Luyendyk drove the car around the track for a couple ceremonial laps.

1991: Marlboro Penske PC-20/Chevrolet (Rick Mears)
This was the same car that Mears had a serious crash with during practice at Indy in 1992. The car, being used as a back-up that year, was demolished. The car is owned by the Penske Team, and was eventually restored to a non-operational display condition. A few very minor details are missing from race-winning condition - the 1991 USAC tech inspection decal, and the RaceCam housing. This car is one of Roger Penske's Indy winning cars (or replicas) that is displayed on a rotating basis at the Penske Racing Museum in Phoenix, Arizona (as of April 2010, the car was not on display there). At the 2010 Indianapolis 500, the infield midway near the Hall of Fame Museum featured the Marlboro Experience, an interactive tent for adult smokers featuring displays provided by Phillip Morris. One of the rooms in the tent was titled "Penske World," and it included many items from Team Penske. All fifteen of owner Roger Penske's Indy 500 "Baby Borg" winner's trophies were on display, as well as the 15 race-winning helmets (or replicas). Included in the display was Rick Mears' 1991 winning car, on loan from the Penske Museum in Arizona. In the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. In 2016 it was again displayed at the HOF for the Team Penske 50th Anniversary exhibiton.

1992: Valvoline Galmer/Chevrolet (Al Unser, Jr.)
The winner of the closest-ever finish in Indianapolis 500 history has been restored to a display condition. During the month of May 2002, Valvoline staged a re-creation of the closest finish for its tenth anniversary. The winning car of Unser, Jr., and the second place car of Scott Goodyear, also restored, were placed on the track in the positions they were in at the 1992 finish. Valvoline owns Unser Jr.'s winning car and indications are that Walker Racing currently still has possession of Goodyear's Mackenzie Finacial Special, and it is on display at their race shop. On Opening Day, May 5, 2008, Al Unser, Jr. drove the car around the track for a ceremonial lap during festivities honoring the Unser family. On October 12, 2010, the car was included in the special Centennial Era photo shoot on the mainstrech at the Speedway, where 33 of the best Indy 500-winning cars were aligned in a starting grid. In the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. This car is usually parked in Valvoline HQ in Ashland KY.

1993: Marlboro Penske PC-22/Chevrolet (Emerson Fittipaldi)
Owned and restored to running condition by the Penske Team. This car is one of Roger Penske's Indy winning cars (or replicas) that is displayed on a rotating basis at the Penske Racing Museum in Phoenix, Arizona (as of April 2010, the car was on display there). In the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. In 2016 it was again displayed at the HOF for the Team Penske 50th Anniversary exhibiton. A replica, was on display at Museu de Tecnologia da ULBRA (Lutheran University of Brazil; Technology Museum), along with the 1993 Chevrolet Camaro Z-28 pace car awarded to Emmo. HOWEVER, the replica and pace car was SIEZED by the Brazian goverment due to his bankruptcy.

1994: Marlboro Penske PC-23/Mercedes 500I (Al Unser, Jr.)
Owned and restored to running condition by the Penske Team. This car is chassis serial number 007. At some time after the race, the car was stored at Longo Toyota in Downey, California. In May 1995, the Penske Team brought the car to the Speedway as a backup (as car #89). Since the team was having trouble getting their primary cars up to speed, the cars was prepared or practice. Emerson Fittipaldi drove the car in practice, but did not attempt to qualify in it. In July of 2001, the car was displayed and run at the Goodwood Festival of Speed at Lord March’s Goodwood estate in southern England. Emerson Fittipaldi, Unser, Jr.'s former Penske teammate drove the car ceremonially. This car is one of Roger Penske's Indy winning cars (or replicas) that is displayed at the Penske Racing Museum in Phoenix, Arizona. In the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. In June 2011, the car participated in the Goodwood Festival of Speed. Emerson Fittipaldi drove the car initially. Mario Illien of Ilmor engineering, who built the Mercedes Benz engine, drove the car later on. However, Illien lost control and crashed the car into a barrier, suffering relatively minor suspension damage. The car is often displayed with a spare 500I engine. In 2016 the car and the spare engine were again displayed at the HOF for the Team Penske 50th Anniversary exhibiton.

1995: Player's Ltd. Reynard/Ford Cosworth XB (Jacques Villeneuve)
Restored to at least display condition, and currently owned by the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Foundation, and housed at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum., where it is on periodic display. The car was reportedly on indefinite loan from car owner Barry Green, but is now being indicated as owned outright by the Speedway. Scott Brayton's 1995 pole winning car is reportedly on display at the Kruse Automotive & Carriage Museum in Auburn, Indiana. On October 12, 2010, the Villeneuve's car was included in the special Centennial Era photo shoot on the mainstrech at the Speedway, where 33 of the best Indy 500-winning cars were aligned in a starting grid. In the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum.

1996: Delta Faucets '95 Reynard/Ford Cosworth XB (Buddy Lazier)
Owned and restored to at least display condition by the Hemelgarn Team. It has been on display at the Hemelgarn Team racing shop in Indianapolis. At some point in the early 2000s, it was on loan and on periodic display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. The car was purchased by Hemelgarn from Chip Ganassi Racing after the 1995 CART season. Jimmy Vasser drove the car in at least one CART race in 1995. Another car from 1996, Arie Luyendyk's '94 Reynard/Ford Cosworth XB, the car that holds the all-time Indianapolis Motor Speedway official qualifying track records, is also owned and displayed periodically at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. Scott Brayton's 1996 pole winning car is reportedly on display at the Kruse Automotive & Carriage Museum in Auburn, Indiana. In the spring of 2011 the Lazier car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum.

1997: Sprint/Miller Lite Olds Aurora (Arie Luyendyk)
This is the same car that Arie qualified and raced in the 1998 race. It is the same car that Sam Schmidt crashed in at Texas Motor Speedway in 1999. The car was owned by winning car owner Fred Treadway. As of 2010, the car is owned by the Dean V. Kruse Foundation, and displayed at the Kruse Automotive & Carriage Museum in Auburn, Indiana. The 1997 second place car of Scott Goodyear (also a Treadway Racing) is also on display with it. In the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum.

1998: Rachel's Potato Chips Dallara/Aurora (Eddie Cheever, Jr.)
The car was owned and restored to at least display condition by the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Foundation, and housed at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. It was on periodic display at the Speedway museum through about 2010. Decaling believed to be slightly different from race winning condition. At some point in 2010, the cars was sold to a private collector (Zak Brown of United Autosports), and is no longer regularly at the Speedway museum. In the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum.

1999: A.J. Foyt PowerTeam Dallara/Olds Aurora (Kenny Brack)
Owned by winning car owner A.J. Foyt and A.J. Foyt Enterprises. Reports indicate the car is typically stored and displayed at the Foyt Racing shop in Waller, Texas. On Opening Day, May 6, 2007, all five of Foyt's winning cars (1961, 1964, 1967, 1977, 1999), and the 1977 Oldsmobile pace car, participated in ceremonial laps celebrating Foyt's fiftieth year of competition at Indy. Darren Manning, racing for Foyt in 2007, drove the 1999 winning car around the track. In addition, for 2007, the car has been on loan, displayed at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum, an arrangement that is figured to be temporary. In the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. In 2017 the car was again back at the HOF for the Foyt exhibition. The usual location for this car is in one of the Foyt shops in Texas or in Indiana.

2000: Target Chip Ganassi G-Force/Olds Aurora (Juan Pablo Montoya)
Owned by winning car owner Chip Ganassi. The car is restored to a running condition. During the weekend of the 2009 Brickyard 400 at Indianapolis, the car was on display with one of Montoya's NASCAR Sprint Cup Series cars. Montoya was trying to be become the first driver to win the Indianapolis 500 and Brickyard 400 in his career. During the month of May 2010, the Speedway was celebrating previous races from years ending in "0." Montoya, the winner in 2000, was featured during highlights, and the car was displayed on race morning along with the winning cars from 1940, 1960, and 1980. On October 12, 2010, the car was included in the special Centennial Era photo shoot on the mainstrech at the Speedway, where 33 of the best Indy 500-winning cars were aligned in a starting grid. In the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. On race morning of 2011, celebrating the 100th Anniversary of the Indy 500.

2001: Marlboro Penske Dallara IR1/Oldsmobile (Helio Castroneves)
This car is owned and maintained by the Penske Team and presumably restored to running condition. As of April 2010, this car is currently on display at the Penske Racing Museum in Phoenix, Arizona. At the time, all three of Helio Castroneves' winning cars (2001, 2002, 2009) were displayed together. In May of 2003, the car was featured in the Speedway's back-to-back winners celebration. On May 9, 2003, Castroneves drove it for a few ceremonial laps around the track. In early 2008, the car was reportedly displayed at the Penske-Wynn Ferrari-Maserati dealership at the Wynn Las Vegas. In the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. In 2016 it was again displayed at the HOF for the Team Penske 50th Anniversary exhibiton.

2002: Marlboro Penske Dallara IR2/Chevrolet (Helio Castroneves)
Car was retired two weeks after winning the race. This car is owned and maintained by the Penske Team and presumably restored to running condition. As of April 2010, this car is currently on display at the Penske Racing Museum in Phoenix, Arizona. At the time, all three of Helio Castroneves' winning cars (2001, 2002, 2009) were displayed together. In the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. In 2016 it was again displayed at the HOF for the Team Penske 50th Anniversary exhibiton.

2003: Marlboro Penske Panoz G Force GF09/Chevrolet (Gil de Ferran)
Owned and maintained to running condition by the Penske Team. This car is one of Roger Penske's Indy winning cars (or replicas) that is displayed at the Penske Racing Museum in Phoenix, Arizona. In the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. In June 2011, the car participated in the Goodwood Festival of Speed. In 2016 it was again displayed at the HOF for the Team Penske 50th Anniversary exhibiton.

2004: Rahal-Letterman Pioneer/Argent Panoz G Force/Honda (Buddy Rice)
This is the same car that Rice crashed in practice for the 2005 race. The car was repaired, and was qualified and driven by Kenny Brack in the 2005 race. He dropped out due to mechanical problems and finished 26th. On July 19th, 2004, Rahal-Letterman Racing took the car to the White House in Washington, DC, after they had been invited to meet the President, and it was displayed on the South Lawn. As of 2007, the car, is owned and displayed at the Honda Collection Hall in Motegi, Japan, as it was Honda's first Indianapolis 500 victory. In the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum.

2005: Klein Tools/Jim Beam Dallara/Honda (Dan Wheldon)
This chassis was Dallara IR5-07. Wheldon also drove this car in 2005 to victories at Pikes Peak and Chicagoland. In 2006, Marco Andretti drove the car in the Indy 500, where he finished second (after being passed by Sam Hornish, Jr. on the final lap). Marco Andretti drove the car at Indy also in 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, and 2011. On January 19, 2006, a replica show version of the car was on display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum in conjunction with a reception announcing the 2006 500 Festival theme "Celebrate the Spectacle." After the conclusion of the 2011 IndyCar season, Andretti Autosport restored the chassis to race-winning display condition (a "roller"), and is displayed at various engagements as a tribute to Wheldon. The restoration process (which was pre-planned) came only weeks after Wheldon's tragic death at Las Vegas.

2006: Marlboro Team Penske Dallara/Honda (Sam Hornish, Jr.)
This car is owned and maintained by the Penske Team and presumably restored to running condition. As of April 2010, this car is currently on display at the Penske Racing Museum in Phoenix, Arizona. The 2006 Chevrolet Corvette Z06 Indianapolis 500 Pace Car that was awarded to Hornish, is also on display at the Penske museum. In the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. In 2016 it was again displayed at the HOF for the Team Penske 50th Anniversary exhibiton.

2007: Canadian Club Dallara/Honda (Dario Franchitti)
On August 5, 2007, Franchitti was driving the car in the Firestone Indy 400 at Michigan International Speedway. He was involved in a major accident, flipping up into the air, and demolishing the car. In 2008, the car was rebuilt, and returned to competition. Andretti Green Racing driver Marco Andretti drove the car at Texas, crashing out with 5 laps to go. In late 2011, Andretti Autosport restored the car to race-winning condition (a "roller") for future displays. Likely stored at Andretti Autosports.

2008: Target Chip Ganassi Racing Dallara/Honda (Scott Dixon)
This car is owned by Chip Ganassi racing and is likely at thier facility. In June 2011, the car participated in the Goodwood Festival of Speed.

2009: Team Penske Dallara/Honda (Helio Castroneves)
This car is owned and maintained by the Penske Team and presumably restored to running condition. As of April 2010, this car is currently on display at the Penske Racing Museum in Phoenix, Arizona. At the time, all three of Helio Castroneves' winning cars (2001, 2002, 2009) were displayed together. In the spring of 2011 the car was included in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. In 2016 it was again displayed at the HOF for the Team Penske 50th Anniversary exhibiton.

2010: Target Chip Ganassi Racing Dallara/Honda (Dario Franchitti)
This car is owned by Chip Ganassi racing and is likely at thier facility. On October 12, 2010, the car was included in the special Centennial Era photo shoot on the mainstrech at the Speedway, where 33 of the best Indy 500-winning cars were aligned in a starting grid. In the spring of 2011 the car was included for a short time in the 100th Anniversary display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum.

2011: William Rast - Curb/Big Machine Records Dallara/Honda (Dan Wheldon)
This chassis was Dallara IR3-07, an original 2003 model year Dallara, and the seventh constructed overall. It was originally purchased by Panther Racing, and Sam Hornish, Jr. drove it in seven races in 2003, winning at Kentucky. It was driven by Tomas Shecter in 2004-2005, the auctioned off where it was purchased by Fernandez Racing. Roth Racing purchased it, and was used in 2008, but not in 2009. FAZZT Race Team bought it from Roth in 2010, and it was the car that Bruno Junquiera qualified at Indy. Sam Schmidt Motorsports took over the chassis in 2011, and Bryan Herta Autosport leased the car for the 2011 Indy 500, as #98. Two weeks after the victory, Wade Cunningham made his IndyCar Series debut driving the car at Texas, now repainted and using #99. He crashed during the first of the two Twin 275s. The car was restored to the winning condition, and displayed, as it represented the important 100th anniversary race, and is a tribute to Wheldon, who was killed in a crash at the Las Vegas Motor Speedway on October 16, 2011, less than five months after the victory. The car is now a fixture in the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum.

2012: Target Chip Ganassi Racing Dallara/Honda (Dario Franchitti)
Little to nothing is known about the status of this car. The tub has presumably been use by Chip Ganassi Racing in both Honda and Chevy aerokit trim. The status of the original Dallara bodyparts is unknown.

2013: Hydroxycut KV Racing Dallara/Chevy (Tony Kanaan)
Purchased by collector Chip Marshall of Variable Bore Rams. KV general manager Steve Moore said almost everything about the car is as it was when it left IMS, with the exception of a new decal wrap. Vasser said the car is showcased with crew uniforms, ticket stubs and assorted other items from that day.

2014: DHL Andretti Autosport Dallara/Honda (Ryan Hunter-Reay)
Serial DW12-057. Continued to be sucessfully raced by RHR in many oval races, (including wining 2015 at Pocono). One of his favorite cars. Car was attempted to be auctioned off while it was still being used, the winner of the auction would get it when RHR and Andretti was finished with it. It would put back into 2014 form with the correct parts. DID NOT SALE AT AUCTION. However sadly the tub was suposedly totaled (while in 2016 Aerokit guise) during a Pocono practice wreck. STATUS UNKNOWN.

2015: Verizon Team Penske Dallara/Chevy with Chevy Aerokit (Juan Pablo Montoya)
This car is owned and maintained by the Penske Team and restored to show condition. (Current "spec" motors are unavailable for show car useage) Car is using correct 2015 Chevy aerokit. In 2016 it was displayed at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum for the Team Penske 50th Anniversary exhibiton.

2016: NAPA Auto Parts Andretti Herta Autosport with Curb Agajanian Dallara/Honda with Honda Aerokit (Alexander Rossi)
Raced the remainder of the season on the superspeedways. (Texas and Pocono). David Bowen the owner of the car had it restored to the Napa colors and aero pieces used in the 100th running. He then donated it to the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum.

2017: Ruoff Home Mortgage Andretti Autosport Dallara/Honda with Honda Aerokit (Takuma Sato)
Raced at Texas the same year and wrecked, car put back together and raced at Pocono (where it took the pole). Car purchased by Honda Japan and restored in Indy winning configuration with a running engine at the Honda Collection Hall in Motegi, Japan.

2018: Verizon Team Penske Dallara/Chevy (Will Power)
Preserved and part of the Penske Collection. Was displayed at the hall of fame museum in 2019.

2018: Menards Team Penske Dallara/Chevy (Simon Pagenaud)
Preserved and part of the Penske Collection.


Special thanks to Keith Johnson ("Doctorindy") the original compiler from 2003-2011,
Also thanks to the members of TrackForum.com and the numerous other individuals who have contributed to this page.

On May 16, 2007, Indianapolis Motor Speedway Historian Donald Davidson, on his radio program The Talk of Gasoline Alley, recounted the complete list of cars and their whereabouts, and revised information from that program has been noted here.

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